Writing Fellows


KU Writing Center Writing Fellows

First started in the 1970s and 80s, writing fellows programs are an increasingly common way to provide writing support. KU’s Writing Fellows program was first piloted in 2012 and then established as the KU Core Writing Fellows Program in 2015. Since its pilot year, writing fellows have worked with courses in the humanities, social sciences, and sciences. To expand offerings, the Writing Fellows program is now open to courses outside of the KU Core.

We are not currently accepting Writing Fellows applications. Check back here for updates. 

Undergraduate Writing Fellows

Writing Fellows (WFs) are undergraduate students who are trained as peer writing consultants and who are paired with a specific course for the entire semester. They collaborate with faculty and serve as facilitators of learning, largely in part by providing constructive critique of student writing, but also through in-class workshops and facilitated peer review sessions. WFs neither teach content nor assign grades—they are not teaching assistants. Instead, they promote writing in the classroom, collaborating with faculty and helping students better understand writing assignments, brainstorm content, and revise drafts to successfully present their thoughts and ideas.

To apply to have a WF in your course, you must be teaching a 16-week course where you plan to assign two major writing assignments or a scaffolded semester-long project. You should be willing to work collaboratively with your WF and the KUWC Assistant Director and adhere to the assignment schedule agreed upon at the beginning of the semester. Courses involving discussion sections and teaching assistants cannot be considered.

If you have questions about the program before you apply, please contact Kara Kynion at kmkynion@ku.edu.


Writing Fellows FAQs

A Writing Fellow is an experienced undergraduate writing consultant who is “embedded” in the course, working with the instructor and students for the entire semester. In the simplest sense, they are devoted to your course. WFs meet with instructors to understand writing assignments, give in-class writing workshops, and meet one-on-one with students to discuss their writing. WFs promote writing in the classroom, collaborating with faculty and helping students better understand writing assignments, brainstorm content, and revise drafts. They serve as facilitators of learning, largely in part by providing constructive critique of student writing. The KU Writing Center first piloted writing fellows in 2012, and since then, we’ve been in courses in a variety of levels and disciplines—like Humanities, American Studies, History, English, Biology and Geology, just to name a few.

You can read more about the benefits of a WF, but our goals are simple: to support faculty in their teaching of writing and to support students in their writing.

Faculty complete a WF Application.  If you apply, we will then reach out to learn more about your class (like assignments, the type of support you think your students will need, etc) and which “model” you’d like to follow. Once we determine whether or not a WF would be a good fit for your course, we’ll create more specific plans/schedule for the semester and plan an in-person meeting. When the semester starts, your WF will give the workshops we agree upon, consult one-on-one with your students and be in contact with you as necessary.

Faculty who are teaching a 16-week course with at least two major writing assignments or a scaffolded semester-long project are welcome to apply. Faculty should be willing to work collaboratively with the WF and the KUWC Assistant Director and adhere to the schedule agreed upon at the beginning of the semester.